Access

Framework

We invite diverse groups of people with disabilities and elders to conduct an accessibility assessment, including a tour of facilities and review of interview and intervention practices.

We invite representatives from culturally distinct communities to review our interview and intervention practices.

We assign designated staff to know and maintain ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) standards for accessibility.

Our agency reflects the diversity of our service area.

We conduct an agency-wide assessment of our disability accessibility policies and practices on a regular basis (i.e., every one to five years).

We conduct an agency-wide assessment of our cultural accessibility policies and practices on a regular basis (i.e., every one to five years).

Process and components

We collaborate with specialists working with people with disabilities, including blind/low vision, Deaf/hard of hearing, physical disabilities, diminished cognition, psychiatric, and others, when the situation requires additional skills and knowledge.

We have a protocol to guide officers in determining a victim’s specific disability accommodation needs.

We have a protocol to guide officers in determining a suspect’s specific disability accommodations needs.

We provide appropriate interpreter services or communication assistance to those involved in a case of reported abuse who have sensory or speaking impairments or limited English proficiency.

We have the training, technology, equipment, or links with community agencies necessary to provide access to our agency for persons with the following kinds of needs:  mobility  vision  hearing  speech  cognition

In our interviews and other interactions we are attentive to and respectful of generational and cultural customs and courtesies.

Our response accounts for ways in which aspects of an elder’s culture or identity might influence her or his decision-making and response, such as:

  • Mistrusting information provided by law enforcement, health care, or social services because of historic discrimination
  • Seeing information provided by law enforcement, health care, or social services as contrary to religious beliefs
  • Deferring to other relatives or adult children when family decision-making is the norm
  • Misunderstanding because of limited English proficiency

Advance to next section: Outreach & Services

To print the full NCALL Self-Assessment, click here. 

Additional resources